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For Sale: 1969 Plymouth Road Runner in Chatsworth, California

Vehicle Description

The Road Runner was a Back to Basics Muscle Car that shed the extra weight and amenities of its more luxurious cousins and rivals.

This Road Runner doubles down on the concept of raw muscle as it has been upgraded with a 440 Six Pack V8 that is fully built and estimated to make 600HP. Mated to a Pistol Grip 4-Speed Manual with Front Disc Brakes, this Road Runner sits on Period Correct Looking American Racing Wheels with huge Micky Thompson tires in the rear and a classic staggered stance.

The underside is very clean as is the redone interior.

A muscular example that is ready to rumble!!

Great lease rates and Financing also available on any of our inventory!
Buy Sell Trade Consignments Welcome!
Please email [email protected] or call 1-818-773-8181

About the Road Runner:

The Plymouth Road Runner is a mid-size car with a focus on performance built by Plymouth in the United States between 1968 and 1980. By 1968, some of the original muscle cars were moving away from their roots as relatively cheap, fast cars as they gained features and increased in price. Plymouth developed the Road Runner to market a lower-priced, basic trim model to its upscale GTX.

Plymouth paid $50,000 to Warner Bros.-Seven Arts to use the Road Runner name and likeness from their Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner cartoons as well as a "beep, beep" horn, which Plymouth paid $10,000 to develop. The Road Runner was based on the Chrysler B platform (the same as the Belvedere and Satellite), as a back-to-basics mid-size performance car.

The earliest of the 1968 models were available only as 2-door pillared coupes, but later in the model year, a 2-door "hardtop" model was offered.

The interior was spartan with a basic vinyl bench seat, lacking even carpets in early models, and few options were available - such as power steering and front disc brakes, AM radio, air conditioning and automatic transmission. A floor-mounted shifter featured only a rubber boot and no console so that a bench seat could be used.

The standard engine was an exclusive "Roadrunner" 383ci B-series V8 engine with a 4-barrel Carter Carburetor rated at 335HP at 5200 rpm and 425 lb�ft at 3400 rpm of torque. Its extra 5HP rating was the result of using the radical cam from the 440 Super Commando and a .25 raise in compression to 10.5:1. When air conditioning was ordered, the cars received the 330HP version, because the radical cam specs did not create enough vacuum to accommodate air conditioning. A $714 option was the 426 cu in (7.0 L) Hemi with 2X4 Carter AFB carburetors rated at 425HP and 490 lb�ft of torque.

The standard equipment transmission was a 4-speed manual transmission with floor shifter, and the three-speed TorqueFlite automatic transmission was optional. Early four-speed 1968 Road Runners featured Inland shifters, which were replaced by Hurst shifters during the course of the model year.

Plymouth expected to sell about 20,000 units in 1968; actual sales numbered around 45,000. This placed the Road Runner third in sales among muscle cars, with only the Pontiac GTO and Chevy's SS-396 Chevelle outselling it. Dodge debuted the Road Runner's cousin, the Super Bee, as a mid-1968 offering after seeing Plymouth's success with the Road Runner.

The 1969 model kept the same basic look, but with slight changes to the taillights and grille, side marker lights, optional bucket seats, and new Road Runner decals. The Road Runner added a convertible option for 1969 with 2,128 such models produced that year. All were 383 cu in (6.3 L) engine cars, except for ten which were equipped with a 426 cu in (7.0 L) Hemi.

An Air Grabber option (N96 code) was introduced this year; it consisted of a fiberglass air duct assembly bolted to the underside of the hood that connected to twin rectangular upward-facing vents in the hood with Rallye red vent screens. The fiberglass hood box had an "Air Grabber" sticker on the front. When the hood was closed, a rubber seal fitted over the large-oval unsilenced air cleaner. A decal with Wile E. Coyote saying "Coyote Duster" was on the air cleaner lid. The assembly ducted air directly into the engine. The vents in the hood could be opened and closed via a lever under the dashboard labeled "Carb Air."

The Plymouth Road Runner was named Motor Trend Car of the Year for 1969.

Whilst Fusion Motor Company make a sincere effort to supply information that is accurate and complete, we are aware that errors and omissions may occur. Therefore, we are not able to guarantee the accuracy of the information and we cannot accept liability for loss or damage arising from misleading information or for any reliance on which you may place on the information contained on this website or our advertisements. We highly recommend that you examine the vehicle to check the accuracy of the information supplied. If you have any questions, please contact us at [email protected] or by calling 818-773-8181

Vehicle Details

  • 1969 Plymouth Road Runner
  • Listing ID:CC-1490164
  • Price:$69,950
  • Location:Chatsworth, California
  • Year:1969
  • Make:Plymouth
  • Model:Road Runner
  • Exterior Color:Orange
  • Interior Color:Black
  • Transmission:Manual
  • Odometer:3085
  • Stock Number:5681446
  • VIN:RM21H9E145164
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