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By Larry Edsall
Back to ClassicCars.com Community

Classic Investments
By Larry Edsall
Online Classic Car Classifieds A couple of weeks ago, I wrote about the Cars That Matter classic cars indexes that Dave Kinney, editor and publisher of the thrice-a-year collector car price guides, has established to track trends in and to provide perspective on various categories.

As you recall, there was a Blue Chip index for 25 most-sought-after vehicles, as well as separate indices for British cars, German cars, Ferraris, American muscle cars and 1950s American classics.

The other category was the "Small Cap Average" index of what Kinney considers to be a dozen "undervalued cars, priced under $25,000, from the 1950s-70s."

Thousands of classic and muscle cars for sale Most of the categories are self-explanatory, but I thought you might be interested in what an expert considers to be undervalued and therefore affordable collectible classics. In Kinney’s eyes, the dozen cars comprising the small cap average index are:

1972-75 Porsche 914 2.0
1969-73 Triumph TR6
1963-64 MGB Mk 1
1971-73 Datsun 240Z
1970 Chevrolet Camaro SS350/300
1969 AMC Javelin 343
1963 Studebaker Avanti R1
1965-67 Chevrolet Corvair Monza convertible
1965-66 Ford Mustang GT coupe
1960-62 Studebaker Lark convertible
1949 Buick Roadmaster sedanette
1967 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia coupe


According to Cars That Matter, the average value of those cars works out to $20,000, up from $18,658 two years ago.

I won’t, but I could tell you stories about my personal relationship with eight of those 12 cars. Funny, I didn’t own any of them, though I did have a ‘69 Mustang fastback. Nonetheless, eight of that dozen were influential in the development of my automotive enthusiasm.

Classic cars for sale coast to coast For example, when I was in college, the Karmann Ghia was my lust car. I often went out of my way to walk past the VW dealership, located, as I recall, just down the block, or maybe it was across the street, from the local Rolls-Royce showroom. Thanks to scholarship money, working every weekend for my hometown newspaper and support from my parents, I went to a very upscale and very excellent university where some students drove to campus in XK-Es or Sting Rays, and one arrived for class each day in a limousine.

I know, I said I wasn’t going to bore you with my personal tales, but just two more:

When I was in high school, my Grandmother’s neighbor owned one of those Corvair Monza convertibles, which pulled me like a magnet over to the driveway to see what to this day remains a unique part of our American automotive heritage.

And in 1971, when a guy ran a stop sign and destroyed my ’69 Mustang, we nearly replaced it with a 914, but instead drove home from the Porsche-Audi dealership in an Audi 100 LS, which to this day remains, in many ways, the best (great winter traction and tremendous highway fuel economy) and worst (major cold-weather starting problems) vehicle I’ve ever owned.

O.K., that’s it. If you want to hear about the others, you’ll have to corner me at a cruise-in somewhere sometime.

To search for the classic cars mentioned in this article, click here

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